Theresa Hak Kyung Cha: Her Story Will Be Continued

 “I want to be the dream of the audience.” – Cha’s manuscript of “A Ble Wail (1975)

A Ble Wail, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, solo performance at the Worth Ryder Gallery in Berkeley, 1975. (©Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, photo courtesy of Trip Callaghan)

A Ble Wail, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, solo performance at the Worth Ryder Gallery in Berkeley, 1975. (©Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, photo courtesy of Trip Callaghan)

Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, born in south Korea, studied in the U.S. and France, received her M.F.A. from U. C. Berkeley in 1978 and worked at Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive. On November 1982, six months after her newlywed, only one week before her book Dictée published, Cha was tragically murdered by a stranger. However, the solo exhibitions and retrospective for Cha, rivetingly, continue appearing at art institutions all over the world. Her reputation has continued to grow.[“Dictee- choreolab Dictee- choreolab DNA” By Soomi Kim from Youtube]

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Trinh T. Minh-ha: The Infinite Reflection Between Mirrors

(“Reassemblage: From the Firelight to the Screen” by walkinthaprospects on Youtube)

Still-image of film A Tale of Love. Produced and directed by Trinh T. Minh-ha and Jean-Paul Bourdier. Photo © Trinh T. Minh-ha

Still-image of film A Tale of Love. Produced and directed by Trinh T. Minh-ha and Jean-Paul Bourdier. Photo © Trinh T. Minh-ha

The image of this mirror reflects another mirror’s reflecting of the other mirror’s reflection… The endless reflective images between the mirrors, is one of the major concepts of Trinh T. Minh-ha’s works. Born in Vietnam, the prolific writer and artist Trinh studied composition, literature and ethnology in Vietnam, the Philippines, France and America. Her insightful cross-cultural and educational backgrounds profoundly contributed to her cross-disciplinary art practice. In her artworks and writings, naturally, Trinh offers multiple perspectives which have challenged the conventional and western notions. Continue reading

Ai Weiwei: Life is in Danger Everyday

Ai Weiwei talks about his concept: (“Ai Weiwei: Life is in danger everyday” by Louisiana Channel)

Ai Weiwei and Coke Cola Urns: The Democratizing or Commercializing of Art?

Ai Weiwei, Neolithic Culture Pot with Coca-Cola Logo, 1992, Neolithic pot with acrylic paint, 12” x 13.125”. Photo: Courtesy of the artist

Ai Weiwei, Neolithic Culture Pot with Coca-Cola Logo, 1992, Neolithic pot with acrylic paint, 12” x 13.125”. Photo: Courtesy of the artist

Ai Weiwei’s works often questions the exchange value of the cultural product in the global capitalistic system. One of the example is “Neolithic Culture Pot with Coca-Cola Logo.” Coca Cola as an art object easily brings us back to Andy Warhol’s concept: art belong to the pop. Warhol’s Pop art establishes the model that brought art to the public eye, not just for the elite. That pop culture can be art is not only revealing the commercial value but also to a certain degree, the democratic preference. Continue reading

Mild but Wild: Graffiti Art in Taiwan

(Virus No.6 Crew-Back to the Streets by joy80211 on Youtube)

Before 2000, most Taiwanese people did not pay much attention to the seemingly random artwork sprayed, stencilled, stickered and painted on the walls of public and private property in their neighbourhood. Graffiti started to show up on the streets since the mid 1990s.
Today, graffiti art groups in Taiwan have noticed both the emergence of street art as a hot issue and the resultant ease with which street art related projects have been able to garner financial support in recent years. How Taiwan’s city governments view street art: Beautification over vandalism? Continue reading

Qin Yufen : Sound, Art, and Asian Aesthetics

Qin Yufen, Wind Without Words, sound installation, 2001

Qin Yufen, Wind Without Words, sound installation, 2001

Qin Yufen, a woman sound artist, born in China and based in Germany for many years. With digital techniques to create sound, Qin further develops the poetic power with her sensibilities of classical Chinese icons. (Click below to see her film clip) Continue reading